Program

 Dr. Mahmoud Rabie

Title: Fabrication of New Superhard Materials with High-Wear and High-Temperature Resistance at Extreme Conditions.

Invited talk

Dr. Mahmoud Rabie

Manufacturing Eng Department, Modern Academy for Engineering and Technology, Egypt

Abstract

Abrasives are highly demanded material for industries such as automotive, aerospace,medical, and agriculture industries which mainly depend on imported added-value materials. In the year 2019, the imports to Egypt have been estimated at 68 billion dollars, while the exports from Egypt were estimated at 25.5 billion dollars. This main deficit of 42.5 billion dollars is mainly because we export raw materials and import added-value materials after it’s manufactured into a final useful product. Therefore, encouraging the production of added-value materials is very strategic to the development of the Egyptian economy, while the invention of new materials is very strategic to the development of the nation’s technological advancement. Believing in this strategic goal, the Egyptian government worked hard to reduce the imports of automotive production parts and spare parts. In the year 2020, Egypt managed to reduce it by about 22% which means 143.5 million dollars saved only for this industrial sector. However, this saved foreign currency was not due to an increase in manufacturing automotive parts locally, but due to a shortage in global supply chains during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Superhard materials are manufactured of diamond or cubic Boron Nitride(cBN). These materials exhibit high hardness and high wear-resistance properties that are useful in several industrial sectors. Processing of hard materials, fabrication of machining tools, manufacturing of braking systems, drilling and mining equipment, diamond coating materials, high-entropy carbides,oil and gas industry, mining industry, quarry stone industry, automotive industry, aerospace and military application.These materials can also havean extended life and wear resistance.In this research, we are developing superhard materials with hardness approaching that of cBN and diamond utilizing various approaches and several synthesis and fabrication techniques

Biography

Dr. Mahmoud Rabie is an assistant professor, researcher, and entrepreneur in the fields of materials science & engineering and innovation management. He obtained his PhD in advanced chemistry from the Complutense University of Madrid in collaboration with the University of Cologne and Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids. He holds also a Master's Degree in Materials Science from three universities, the Technical University of Munich, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, and the University of Rennes 1. His research is currently focused on functional materials with industrial applications or market commercialization potential, e.g. magnetocaloric, ultrahard, and high-entropy alloys. He is a lecturer at a private university in Egypt, a visiting researcher at the Complutense University of Madrid, a team leader at Egypt Scholars Inc, and the Founder and CEO of InnoBel for innovation consulting services in the MENA region.

Prof. Jia-Kuo Yu

Title: DNA supramolecular hydrogel as Anti-Friction MSCs Delivery system improves the therapy for severe osteoarthritis

Invited talk

Prof. Jia-Kuo Yu

Peking University Institute of Sports Medicine, China

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a musculoskeletal disorder disease affecting about 500 million people worldwide and Mesenchymal Sem Cells (MSCs) therapy has been demonstrated as a potential strategy to treat OA. However, the shear forces during direct injection and the harsher shear condition of OA environment lead to significant cell damage and inhibit the therapeutic efficacy. Herein, a new strategy is proposed by applying DNA supramolecular hydrogel as delivering material of MSCs to treat severe OA model, which perform extraordinary protection of the MSCs against the shear force both in vitro and in vivo with high cell viability. We demonstrate the DNA supramolecular hydrogel promote formation of quality cartilage, reduce osteophyte and normalize subchondral bone under the high friction condition of OA, whose molecular mechanisms underlying therapeutic effects are also investigated. It can be anticipated that DNA supramolecular hydrogel would be a promising cell delivery system for multiple potential MSCs therapy.

 

Biography

Jia-Kuo Yu received his Ph.D degree at Peking University, is a professor and director at Peking University Institute of Sports Medicine. He is also the director of the Knee Surgery Department within Sports MedicineTeam of Peking University 3rd Hospital and is a medical specialist for national sports teams preparing for every Summer Olympic Games and the Winter Olympic Games. He is the founder of the Geriatric Sports Medicine Association of the Chinese Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics and now was its founding Chairman. He is also the vice-chairman of the Chinese Society of Sports Medicine of the Chinese Medical Association. His research focuses on (1) susceptibility genes of knee joint disorders, (2) personalized customerised total knee prosthesis, (3) tissue-engineered meniscus, cartilage, and ligament, (4) minimally invasive reconstruction of the knee and patellofemoral joint. He has published more than 200 academic papers.

Prof. Brian Cantor

Title: Multicomponent High-Entropy Cantor alloys

Plenery talk

Prof. Brian Cantor

CBE FREng Department of Materials, Oxford University, UK

Abstract

All human advances have depended on making new materials, and all materials are alloys, i.e. mixtures of several different starting materials or components. So the history of the human race has been the continued invention of new materials by discovering new alloys. Recently a new way of doing this, by manufacturing multicomponent high-entropy alloys, has shown that the total number of possible materials is enormous, even more than the number of atoms in the galaxy, so we have lots of wonderful new materials yet to find. And multicomponent phase space contains a surprisingly large number of extended solid solutions. The first group of these which was discovered are called Cantor alloys, an enormous composition range with a single-phase fcc structure, based loosely on the original equiatomic five-component Cantor alloy CrMnFeCoNi. This talk will discuss the previous history of alloying, the discovery of multicomponent alloys, the structure of multicomponent phase space, the fundamental thermodynamics of multicomponent solid solutions such as the Cantor alloys, the complexity of local atomic and nanoscale configurations in such materials, the effect of this on properties such as atomic diffusion, dislocation slip, and the resulting outstanding mechanical properties and potential applications, including at low and high temperatures, for corrosion and radiation resistance, and to enhance recycling and re-use.

Biography

Brian Cantor is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Materials at the University of Oxford and a Research Professor in the Brunel Centre for Advanced Solidification Technology at Brunel University. He was previously Vice-Chancellor of the University of York and of Bradford University, Head of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Oxford, a research scientist and engineer at General Electric Research Labs in the USA, and worked briefly at Banaras Hindu University, Washington State, Northeastern, IISc Bangalore and the Kobe Institute. He founded and built up the World Technology Universities Network, the UK National Science Learning Centre, the Hull-York Medical School, and Oxford’s Begbroke Science Park. He was a long-standing consultant for Alcan, NASA and Rolls-Royce, and editor of Progress in Materials Science. He invented the new field of multicomponent high-entropy alloys and discovered the so-called Cantor alloys

Dr. Eng. Alina Vladescu

Title: Ternary Zr-Cu biocompatible Thin Film Metallic Glasses

Invited talk

Dr. Eng. Alina Vladescu

Senior Research Scientist at National Institute for Research and Development in Opto electronics

Abstract

In the present report,ZrCu-X Thin Film Metallic Glasses (TFMGs) were investigated as a candidate for orthopaedic implants (X can be one of Si, Mg, Ca, Sr, Mo). We have studyingTFMGs due to their amorphous structure and resistance to corrosion in human body solutions. Moreover, these films proved to avoid stress shielding effect in the case of hip implants. For the present study, the TFMGs were obtainedby cathodic arc method using a system with high deposition rate. Both 316Lstainless steel and Ti6Al4V alloy were selected for investigation because both are commonly used for manufacture of orthopaedic implants. Each film was characterized in terms of structure, composition, morphology, hardness, adhesion, roughness. The special attention was devoted to evaluate of in vitrocorrosion performance at 37⁰C in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in vitro bioactivity for 1, 3, 7 and 14 days of immersion on SBF at 37⁰C. All tests were performed in comparison with the uncoated alloys. All of the films improved the properties of Ti6Al4V alloy and 316L steel. The films deposited on Ti6Al4V alloy were more proper for orthopaedic applications.  

We acknowledge the support of the Romanian Ministry of Education and Research, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project PN-III-P4-ID-PCE-2020-1264 (PCE92/2021), within PNCDI III, and by Romanian Ministry of Research, Innovation and Digitalization, through Program 1- Development of the national research-development system, Subprogram 1.2 - Institutional performance - Projects to finance the excellent RDI, Contract no. 18PFE/30.12.2021.

Biography

Dr.Eng.Alina Vladescu, has a B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University Politehnica of Bucharest (2002) and an MS in Biomaterials from the Department of Bioengineering and Biotechnology, University Politehnica of Bucharest (2004). Her PhD however is in Materials Science from University Politehnica of Bucharest (2011). She works at National Institute of RD for Optoelectronics INOE2000, Department for Advanced Surface Processing and Analysis by Vacuum Technologies. She is also associate professor in Surface Engineering atUniversity Politehnica of Bucharest. She is also affiliated as research scientist at National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University.

Prof Vladimir V. Rumyantsev

Title: Dispersion of Polaritonic Excitations in Non-Ideal Lattices of Coupled Microcavities Containing Quantum Dots

Keynote

Prof Vladimir V. Rumyantsev

Head of Department of Theory of Complex Systems Dynamic Properties at A.A. Galkin Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering, Ukraine.

Abstract

Designing and utilization of novel materials for manufacturing of the sources of coherent irradiation is currently a vast interdisciplinary area, which spans various theoretical and fundamental aspects of laser physics, condensed matter physics, nanotechnology, chemistry as well information science. Physical realization of corresponding devices requires the ability to manipulate the group velocity of propagation of electromagnetic pulses, which is accomplished by the use of the so-called polaritonic crystals. The latter represent a particular type of photonic crystals featured by a strong coupling between medium quantum excitations (excitons) and optical field. 

The report is devoted to elucidation of the effect of point-like defects on electromagnetic excitations (polaritons) dispersion in a 1D and 2D array of microcavity (microresonator) with embedded one-level quantum dots. It is shown that the presence of vacancies in the microcavity and atomic (quantum dots) subsystems results in a substantial renormalization of polariton spectrum and thus in a considerable alteration of optical properties of the structure. Introduction of defects leads to an increase in the effective masses of polaritons and hence to a decrease of their group velocity. Our model is primarily based on the virtual crystal approximation, which is often employed to examine quasiparticle excitations in sufficiently simple disordered superstructures. More complex systems usually require the use of more sophisticated methods such as the (one- or multinode) coherent potential approximation, the averaged T-matrix method and their various modifications The obtained numerical results help to obtain new composite polariton structures and expand the prospects for their use in the construction of solid-state devices with controlled propagation of electromagnetic waves.

Biography

Vladimir V. Rumyantsev is Chair of the Department of Theory of Complex Systems Dynamic Properties at A.A. Galkin Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering. He is Professor of Theoretical Physics and Nanotechnology Department at Donetsk National University. He received PhD in Theoretical Physics (1988) and Dr. Sci. in Condensed Matter Physics (2007). Prof. Rumyantsev has authored/co-authored 4 books, 2 chapters in books and more than 330 scientific publications. He is a member of the American Physical Society as well as Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics (MIFP, Italy).

Prof. Per Arvid Löthman

Title: Magnetics in Fluids

Keynote

Prof. Per Arvid Löthman

Foviatech GmbH, Hamburg, Germany

Abstract

We measured the time dependent magnetic response of Au/Ni81Fe19/Au magnetic discs dispersed in aqueous solution. These dispersions of microfabricated discs are considered as alternatives to colloidal dispersions for biomedical applications [1], especially when the shape of the hysteresis loop has a strong effect on the performance of the dispersion. The discs are fabricated by lithography and ion beam etching and measure 2 or 3 µm in diameter at a thickness ranging from 17 to 150nm. 

Hysteresis loops weremeasured on a time-scale of an hour by vibrating sample magnetometry and at five milliseconds by magnetic particle spectrometry. The magnetic response of a commercial dispersion of superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles used in biomedical applications (FeraSpin) was measured underidentical conditions. The time dependency of the hysteresis loop of a dispersion of microfabricated particles is very different from this standard. In contrast to these super-paramagnetic particles, the shape of the hysteresis loop measured by magnetic particle spectrometry at 20 kHz is very similar to the quasi-static loop measured by vibrating sample magnetometry, with a coercivity increase of only 60%. Compared to the standard, the micro-fabricated particles saturate in much lower fields, as low as 12 mT, and the shape of the hysteresis loop is relatively independent on the field sweep rate.

Magnetic Particle Spectrometry records the magnetic response of the sample at harmonics of the drive frequency. In contrast to the standard, the difference in phase between higher harmonics of the microfabricated discs is constant up to the 20th harmonic.

These radically different magnetic properties suggest that that microfabricated particles have advantages for applications such as magnetic particle imaging [2]. Further examples of magnetics in ffluids covered are magnetotactic bacteria and self-assembly of magnetic polymeric spheres. With this magnetics in fluids is covered at three different scales.

Biography

Dr. Per A. Löthman obtained his Ph.D. degree from Twente University , The Netherlands in the field of Macroscopic Magnetic Self-assembly and conducted research in Canada, France and Germany on carbon nanotubes, Graphen and related nanomaterials. His research is interdisciplinary and involve BioNanotechnology including DNA, S-layers, Viruses (archaea, bacteriophages), Biomolecular Architecture. Botany and functional surfaces. Dr. Löthman has published over 60 scientifical articles, several book chapters and serves as a reviewer for several journals such as Journal of Bioanalytical and Analytical Chemistry, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, Thin Solid Films, Sensors and Actuators, Microsystems Technologies, Biophysical Reviews and Letters, He is Senior Research Scientist at Foviatech GmbH in Hamburg, Germany, a young innovative high-tech company in the field of advanced materials and artificial intelligence, and a lecturer in Nanomedicine, Nanopharmacy and Nanomaterials (Kaiserslautern University) and Mechatronics Systems and Design (Hamburg University), Germany.

Prof. Julian Polte

Title: Recent Advances in Precision Additive Manufacturing of Metal Parts

Keynote

Prof. Julian Polte

Professor for precision Additive Manufacturing at the TU Berlin, Germany

Abstract

A paradigm shift from mechanical to non-mechanical thinking and a redefinition of production technology is essential to unleash Additive Manufacturing's capabilities and bridge the gap to future needs. Additive Manufacturing processes enable lightweight designs of highly complex metallic workpieces and ensure an increasingly important saving of resources and energies. Nevertheless, Additive Manufacturing processes are limited regarding the achievable surface roughness values 5 µm ≤ Ra ≤ 15 µm, the geometrical accuracies and the occurring residual stresses. Due to increasing demands on the properties of additively manufactured workpieces, the development of innovative technologies and process chains is essential for a broad industrial application. Recent advances in process development allow for drastically improvements of surface roughness values and geometrical accuracies in a single digit micrometer range.

Biography

Julian Polte is Professor for precision Additive Manufacturing at the TU Berlin and got a Doctor degree of Engineering -Dr.-Ing.- from the Technische Universität Berlin and spent more than 10 years scientific, industrial and educational challenges in Precision Engineering, Advanced Manufacturing Technologies, Additive Manufacturing, Industry 4.0 and the optimization of the related value chains and dedicates his scientific career, applied research, industrialization programs and high quality education. Julian Polte was an Research Affiliate at the renowned and worldwide leading International Academy for Production Technology CIRP. At the Fraunhofer Institute IPK Julian Polte leads different departments with great impact into industry. He successfully published more than 100 articles and contributions in magazines, journals and on conferences.

Dr. KRS Murthy

Title: Holistic Novel Paradigms & Paradigm Shifts in Nano-Micro and Sub-Nano Materials

Keynote

Dr. KRS Murthy

Chairman of the Board of High Technology Companies, Proton Equity Global, United States

Abstract

Nano and Micro Technology have been pivotal to progress not only in science and technology disciplines but also in the productization of novel materials applicable to diverse industry verticals. Application areas include aerospace, defense, bio, medicine, drug discovery, semiconductors, microfluidics, quantum computing, quantum cryptography, metrology, metamaterials, automotive industry, and electric cars. Dr. KRS Murthy’s Grand Keynote will cover not only areas in vogue in the first two decades of 2000, the early 2020s, and also the futuristic opportunities in R&D, products, supply chain, and most importantly in the intersection of a variety of multidisciplinary R&D and product possibilities. Dr. KRS Murthy has already developed novel paradigms, paradigm shifts, paradigm reversals, and axiomatic, foundational, and seminal contributions in over 25 diverse disciplines. He will unveil and explain similar foundational R&D and industrial opportunities in nano, micro, and quantum realms

Biography

Dr. KRS Murthy has been featured in paper media, electronic media like the radio and TV, starting from his tender preteen and teen years, He has shared the stage with many Who's Who of the world to include few Nobel Laureates (Late Sir CV Raman, John Bardeen = inventor of the transistor, Arno Penzias = Cosmic Microwave Background - CMB and the Big Bang), few Jnana Peetha Awardees, Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam, Late Vikram Sarabhai, other few Chairman of ISRO, series of CEOs of TCS, Wipro CEO and Founder Azim Premji, Sam Petroda, Three Star Generals in the USA, President of Stanford University Dr. John Hennessey, Steve Wozniak (Apple), Dan Madden, Founding CEO of Applied Materials, Gardon Moore, Founder of Intel, Fathers, and Pioneers of many technologies, Provincial Chiefs of China, President of the reputed KAIST in South Korea, Lt. Governor of California, Mr. Pat Graham, Founder of Bain Capital and who was a boss to Mitt Romney, John Donahue (EBay), Meg Whitman (HP) and a few big company executives in Japan. He has developed national (for PM Modi) and corporate strategies in 26 verticals He was rated as the best professor in a 360-degree rating at the university level, when four other departments requested him to be an adjunct professor, including the management, computer science, aerospace, and music departments, which is a university historical record and also a world record.. He is a Founder, Adviser to Chancellors, Provosts, Deans, and Professors of a few universities, the latest being UC Merced. IEEE Nano Conferences Founding Executive Board member of the IEEE Nanotechnology Council, and Executive Committee of the Silicon Valley area, organized 250 monthly talks, 25 annual conferences in various themes in nano and micro technologies, featuring many Who;s Who in nano and micro technologies. Contributions to Nano-Micro and Meta Materials Nano, Micro, Materials Science, Materials Engineering, Meta Materials, MEMS, NEMS, Quantum Computing, Quantum Communications, Quantum Cryptography, Carbon Nano Tubes, Carbon Micro Fibers, Nano-Structures, Optical Finers, Optical Communications, Micro and Nano based Designer Materials and Structures, Nano and Micro based Cooling Applications for Micro Processors, 2D, and 3D Semiconductor Cooling, Solar Cells and Solar Panels Cooling and Thermal Management, Thin Film, Poly, and Crystalline PV Cooling at Cell, Panel, and Solar Farm Level Cooling, Concentrated PV (CPV) Device with World's Highest Solar Concentration of 2000, Cell, Package, Panel,, and Farm-level Cooling, Solar Thermal, Concentrated Solar Thermal Device, the panel, and Farm Level Cooling, NanoTechnology based Body Fluids Metrology of Urine, Saliva, and Sweat Metrology to Parts Per Trillion Level Accuracy and Precision, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) and Technology-Based Metrology Futuristic Science, Technology, Manufacturing, in-Situ Metrology, and Quality Control in various Nano, Micro, and MEMS Technology, He was an executive in aerospace, NASA, military equipment, AT&T, Bell Labs, and Business Unit Chief in GE, directly reporting to Jack Welch, BOD of companies in computing, memories, nano, micro, composites, and solar. wind power, algae, waste to energy, fuel cells, multi-cloud, AI and ML, blockchain, pharma drug discovery. agriculture, forestry, venture capital, M&A, and large private equity, A child prodigy with numerous lifetime accomplishments encompassing technology, entertainment, business, entrepreneurship, public speaker, and visionary leadership. An internationally reputed Serial Entrepreneur and Serial C-Level Executive, his achievements include aiding the growth of a few American Companies to record revenues and corporate valuation. One of the companies he was President of was listed as the Fastest Growing and 2nd Largest African American Company by Black Enterprise Magazine with $500M revenue and over $3.5B Valuation. Awards winner since preteen and teen years, Dr. KRS Murthy has excelled with a track record of excellence in R&D ($100M R&D funding per year for decades), the fastest-growing company in the USA ($60M to $500M in one year), and National Holistic Strategies in 10 verticals in the USA and for PM Modi in India, Overall he has chaired & organized 500 global level conferences in quantum computing, AI, ML, science, technology, engineering, material sciences, nanotechnology, management, manufacturing, renewable energy, university education, music, art, literature, cosmology, pharmaceutical drug discovery & healthcare. The total number of attendees, accumulated over the decades, exceeds 500,000 = half a million and 25000 speakers and panelists.

Prof. J.C. Umavathi

Title: Micropolar nanofluid overlying a porous layer: Thermosolutal convection

Keynote

Prof. J.C. Umavathi

Gulbarga University, India

Abstract

An investigation of the stability of an micropolar nanofluid overlying a sparsely packed porous medium and implanted in a parallel conduit is reviewed. Linear and also nonlinear terms are incorporated for the study. A Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer drag force model is deployed. To evaluate nanoscale effects the Buongiorno model is employed. The equations for mass, momentum, angular momentum, energy and nanoparticle species conservation with correlated wall conditions are non-dimensionalized. Modified diffusivity ratio and Lewis number stable the system, the micropolar parameters concentration Rayleigh number destable system for stationary convection.  Concentration Rayleigh number, micropolar parameters stabilize and Lewis number destabilizes the system for oscillatory convection. Applications of the study include  micro/nano-fluidic devices, nano-doped energy systems and packed beds in chemical engineering. 

Biography

Prof. J.C. Umavathi, Gulbarga University, India J.C. Umavathi completed her Post Doctral from the Department of Engineering, University of Sannio, Piazza Roma 21, 82100 Benevento, Italy. She is working as Professor in the Department of mathematics, Gulbarga University since 1993. She has published more than 215 research articles in reputed international journals. She is a recipient of Kalpana Chawla Young Scientist award, Sir J.C. Bose award and Erasmus Mundus Fellowship.

Mr.Narugopal Manna

Title: Active Interface Engineered Oxygen Electrocatalysts for Electrochemical Energy Applications.

Invited talk

Mr.Narugopal Manna

National Chemical Laboratory, India

Abstract

To overcome the existing limitations related to the oxygen electrokinetics in the electrochemical energy devices such as water electrolyzer (OER), PEMFCs (ORR), and RZAB (ORR and OER), more cost-effective and durable catalysts are required. Therefore, strategic modulation of the required active sites and structural fine-tuning of the catalyst morphologies and functionalities are necessary to effectively overcome many of these existing challenges. The size, shape, and compositional tuning of the active centers are promising ways to improve the catalyst performance. In addition, the support morphology plays an important role in effectively meeting the various critical activity deciding factors such as mass transport and active site accessibility. Apart from the morphology, the selected support should have electronic conductivity for better electron transport, structural rigidity, and corrosion resistance for enabling the system to withstand harsh electrochemical conditions. Along with these, considering the cost as well as performance deciding factors, the development of low-Pt, and Pt-free electrocatalysts for ORR and OER applications is also becoming an important thrust area. Moreover, compared to the conventional 1D and 2D structured support materials, the less explored 3D structured supports have the unique advantages of providing better accessible actives sites, which results in improved electrocatalytic performance. In the context of the abovementioned technical challenges, a focused effort has been made, as detailed in the various working chapters of this thesis, to develop a series of new classes of the graphene-based 3D structured electrocatalysts for the oxygen electrochemistry applications. The synthesized catalysts show significantly improved performance compared to the state-of-the-art catalysts for the respective reactions. The relevant morphology of the 3D graphene also provides unique structural integrity. In addition, the doping of nitrogen into the 3D framework of the graphene sheets provides efficient anchoring sites for the uniform and well-anchored dispersion of the desired active sites. Furthermore, the stable morphology of the 3D support with its N-doped centers improves the metal-support interaction and thus the designed systems are found to be surviving well under the harsh electrochemical conditions. The 3D morphological features of the catalysts are also helpful for achieving better electrode-electrolyte interface formation and, thereby, improved active site utilization. Further, the creation of additional porosity on the 3D support matrix within the range of micro to meso shows another significant advantage of achieving the formation and dispersion  of nanometer-sized alloy nanoparticles on the support surface.

Biography

Mr. Naregopal Manna is a Doctoral Fellow at the CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory. He has done M.Sc from Calcutta University. After that, He joined NCL in 2016. His main research lines include the synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials based electroctalysts for electrochemical energy applications. Throughout his scientific career, he has participated in national and international conferences. Additionally, He has published six articles on electrocatalysts development and energy applications.

Dr. Claudia Battistella

Title: Synthetic Melanin, from Bioinspired Hair Dye to the Development of Bioinspired Functional Fibers

Invited talk

Dr. Claudia Battistella

Northwestern University, United States

Abstract

In recent decades, synthetic efforts have centered on dopamine oxidation to polydopamine, a synthetic polymeric eumelanin similar to that found in nature. In humans, melanin imparts color to hair and skin and acts as a natural sunscreen and radical scavenger, thereby protecting lipids and proteins from damage. In this work, novel, mild, biocompatible approaches were developed to establish a metal-free route to tunable, nature-inspired, long-lasting nanoparticles coating on human hair. Synthetic and formulation routes were deveoped to achieve this goal and showed efficacy on human hair substrates via multiple spectroscopic and imaging techniques. Owing to the mild and inexpensive conditions employed, this novel approach has the potential to replace classical harsh hair dyeing conditions that have raised concerns for several decades due to their potential toxicity. In addition to providing natural coloration, these coatings have the potential to act as protective sunscreens that prevent photodamage of the inner hair fibers during exposure to sunlight. The protocols developed herein represent a mild and efficient route to nature-inspired multifunctional coatings. Such materials are promising candidates for artificial hair pigmentation and, more generally, provides a novel bioispired coatings approach, which can find extensive application in the development of bioinspired functional fibers.

Biography

Claudia Battistella received both her Bachelor's and Master's degree in industrial chemistry from the University of Padua (Italy). She then moved to the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland) where she specialized in polymer chemistry and drug delivery and she received her Ph.D. in Materials Science in 2017. As a postdoc, first at Northwestern University and then at the University of Chicago (Chicago, USA) she focused on the development of antigenic polymers and she developed novel bioinspired materials such as melanin derivatives and polymeric adhesives. Since May 2021 she works as a Scientist in a private company in the consumables development department.

Dr. N.Manikanthababu

Title: New generation high-power β-Ga2O3-based devices: Relaibality studies for space electronics

Invited talk

Dr. N.Manikanthababu

Department of Physics, IIT Delhi, India

Abstract

β-Ga2O3became an ultimate choice of emerging new generation material for its wide range of compelling applications in power electronics. In situ 120 MeV Ag7+ SHI irradiation on Ni/β-Ga2O3 vertical SBDs. The irradiation-induced degradation at the ion fluences ranges from 1×1010 ions/cm2 to 1×1012 ions/cm2 was observed. The leakage current density is four orders higher between the pristine and highest fluence at -1 V, whereas the series resistance value increased from 3.38×103 to 1.15×104 Ω. The estimated ΦB decreases from 1.11 to 0.93 eV, and the η rises from 1.16 to 2.06. In situ electrical characteristics were performed using same ions on Ni/HfO2/β-Ga2O3 devices. The PF emission is significant within 2.25–7.50 MV/cm until 5×1012 ions/cm2 and covers a full range 1×1013 and 5×1013 ions/cm2 under gate injection. From FN tunneling, the BH of β-Ga2O3/HfO2interface is 0.78 eV and 0.69 eV at 1×1013 ions/cm2 and 5×1013 ions/cm2. XPS of O 1s reveals an increase in O defects within HfO2 due to electronic excitation. β-Ga2O3(1.1 μm) thinfilms were deposited on a c-plane sapphire substrate using MOCVD. The interdigitated electrodes of Ni/Au were deposited on the surface of β-Ga2O3 for fabricating MSM SBPDs. 106 times the photo to dark current ratio (PDCR) was observed. The high responsivity of 70.63 mA/W with detectivity of 6.9×1016 Jones. The noise equivalent power (NEP) is estimated to be 1.6×1016 W/Hz1/2, and the gain is found to be 360. These devices were tested for 500 kGy gamma dose and the device attributes no siginiant change.

Biography

Dr N. Manikanthababu completed his PhD, from the School of Physics, University of Hyderabad in2016. Later, he worked at IGCAR, Kalpakkam as a SERB-National post-doctoral fellow until 2020. From2020, he is working as a BRICS international post-doctoral fellow at the Department of Physics, IndianInstitute of Technology Delhi.He has worked on HfO2-based new generation state-of-the-art MOS devices. Currently he is working on the fabrication of high-power devices such as Ga2O3. He has published 20 research articles in peer reviewed journals and presented his work at various platforms across the globe. He is currently serving as a reviewer of 7 international journals and author of a book.

Dr. Annalisa Bruno

Title: Co-Evaporated Metal Halide Perovskites: from Small Areas Solar Cells to Mini-module

Keynote

Dr. Annalisa Bruno

Principal Scientist , Renewable Energies Innovator, Singapore

Abstract

Metal-halide perovskites made a breakthrough in photovoltaic and light-emitting technologies in the last ten years. MHPs are one of the most promising low-cost materials, due to their excellent optoelectronic properties and fabrication versatility. Since the advent of the first perovskite solar cells (PSCs) in 2009, their power conversion efficiency (PCE) has now reached 25.6% [1], for active areas smaller than 1 cm2 and their operational stability is constantly improving [2-4]. The interest in transferring the existing technology into large-area perovskite modules using industrial-compatible techniques is exploding. In this talk, I will show why thermal evaporation is a promising perovskite fabrication technique to bring this technology closer to reliable and extended production, by relying on excellent size scalability, promising stability, fine composition control, and surface adaptability [5]. The co-evaporated perovskite thin films are uniform over large areas with low surface roughness and a long carrier lifetime. I will present our highly efficient, large area, PSCs where the MAPbI3 perovskite is deposited by thermal co-evaporation. Developing optimization strategies customized for n.i.p [6, 7] and p.i.n [8] architectures the PSCs achieved PCEs above 20% in both configurations. Moreover, the co-evaporated MAPbI3 is formed intrinsically strain-free and the PSCs showed remarkable structural robustness and impressive thermal maintaining over ≈80% of their initial PCE after 3600 under continuous thermal aging at 85 °C without encapsulation [9]. Extrapolating the optimization strategies over large areas, the co-evaporated mini-modules achieved record PCEs up to 18.7% for active areas larger than 10 cm2 [5] [10]. Moreover, looking toward building-integrated photovoltaics we have also developed colored semitransparent PSCs and mini-modules with a wide range of colors. I will further discuss how these results represent a significant step toward the commercialization of the perovskite technology

Biography

Annalisa Bruno is a Principal Scientist at the Energy Research Institute at Nanyang Technological University (ERI@N) leading the Thermally Evaporated and Tandem Solar Cells team and a tenured Senior Staff Scientist at Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy, and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA). Annalisa received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. Degrees in Physics from the University of Naples Federico II, Italy. After, she joined the Chemistry Department of Imperial College London as Post Doctoral Research Associate studying organic and hybrid materials for optoelectronic applications.

M.Ozgur Seydibeyoglu

Title: The Effect of Bolt Production from Polymer-Based Filament with 3D Printer on Mechanical Properties

Invited talk

M.Ozgur Seydibeyoglu

Visiting Research Professor at University of Maine, United States

Abstract

In recent years, the use of 3D printers, which are widely used in additive manufacturing, has become widespread. Various product groups have been started to be produced. With this method; differing from traditional production methods, bolts and nuts made of steel material are produced with a 3D printer, which is a new production method. In the 3D-printing method, M8x50 DIN 933 bolts and M8 DIN 934 nuts are designed from polymer-based PA6, PETG, PLA, PA6 10% carbon fiber filament. These produced bolts and nuts were produced with different nozzle directions (±45° and 0/90°) applied during the production of the 3D printer. Mechanical tests were done on the bolts such as torque and hardness. The mechanical effects of nozzle directions on bolts and nuts were investigated. By comparing the obtained data with various materials used, the effect of material selection and the printing direction of the nozzle is discussed.

 

Biography

Dr. Ozgur Seydibeyoglu is a Professor in Materials Engineering Department in Turkey and he is a Visiting Professor at the University of Maine. He has been working on sustainable materials for 20 years in the area of biopolymers and natural fibers including nanocellulose in different countries. He published more than 100 publications on sustainable technologies with 1424 citations to his publications. Besides his technical expertise on Materials Science and Sustainable Materials, Dr. Seydibeyoglu holds a second MS degree on Engineering Management and he alsohas a publication on Technology Management.

Dr. Marc Langela

Title: Tailormade high performance polymers for demanding applications

Invited talk

Dr. Marc Langela

Head of Material and Product Development at STASSKOL, Germany

Abstract

The processing of high-performance plastics such as polytetrafluoroethylene, polyaryletherketones (e.g. PEEK, PEK, PEKEKK) and polyimides represents the high-end discipline of plastics processing. The challenge is posed by high melting and glass transition temperatures, which place special demands on the processes and the equipment to be used. Particularly in the area of highly filled recipes based on thermoplastic materials (e.g. PEEK), classic processes such as extrusion and injection molding quickly reach their limits. In order to extend these limits, and also to enable highly filled materials based on sintered polymers (e.g. PTFE, polyimide), STASSKOL has perfected the Hot Compression Molding (HCM) process. This allows the development and production of new compounds with metal-like properties. Particularly noteworthy here are the tribological properties, i.e. the minimization of friction and wear, as well as high strength through the incorporation of high proportions of carbon fibers, and the reduction of surface and contact resistances up to electrical conductivity. Furthermore, these properties can be efficiently combined to tailor the materials to customer requirements

Biography

Dr. Marc Langela joined STASSKOL in 2007 as Head of the Research & Development Department. His responsibilities are including the development of new sealing materials and new spare part designs as well as the improvement of technical processes and workshop standards. Dr. Marc Langela received his PhD in Polymer Chemistry in 2002 at the Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz and he recently received his International Master of Business Administration at the Mannheim Business School and the ESSEC Business School in Paris. Parallel to his job profession he takes the responsibility as Chairman of the EFRC Working Group.

Mr. Khaled Zoroufchi Benis

Title: Agricultural-residues based materials for removal of contaminants from water

Invited talk

Mr. Khaled Zoroufchi Benis

University of Saskatchewan, Canada

Abstract

Adsorption is considered an efficient and cost-effective treatment method for removing contaminants from various water matrices. The cost of adsorption can be lowered by using locally available and abundant agricultural residue (biomass) adsorbents. However, untreated biomasses often have low sorption capacity, can be fragile, and can lead to the coloration of water when used in adsorption processes. Therefore, biomasses should be modified before their application as adsorbents. Canola straw (CS), an abundant agricultural residue in Canada, was modified by deposition of iron-oxide on its surface via three different methods. Chemically modified biomass (CMBM) was synthesized by mixing CS with FeCl3 solution. Electrochemical chemically modified biomass (ECMBM) was prepared by exposing CS to Fe ions in an electrochemical cell. To prepare electrochemically modified biochar (ECMBC), CS was pyrolyzed at 350 °C for 1 h and then modified in the electrochemical cell. 

The adsorption capacity of CS for arsenic (As) was negligible. However, the As adsorption capacities of CMBM, ECMBM, and ECMBC were 2.39, 2.15, and 3.20 mg/g, with the equilibrium times of 72, 48, and 24 h, respectively. Therefore, the applied modification methods successfully increased the adsorption capacity of biomass and shortened the required time for adsorption. The higher adsorption capacity of ECMBC was attributed to its higher surface area and well-dispersed iron-oxides on its surface. Investigating the mechanism of As adsorption on the modified adsorbents showed that the inner-sphere complexation of As oxyanions with the deposited iron-oxides on the surface of adsorbents was the main As adsorption mechanism.

Biography

Khaled Zoroufchi Benis is a researcher at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada. He received B.Sc. degree in chemical engineering (2009) and M.Sc. degree in chemical-environmental engineering (2011), and then after worked as an environmental engineer, and taught as a sessional lecturer at the university. His research is focused on the volariztion of agricultural residues and making functionalized materials using chemical and electrochemical treatment methods.

Prof. Osman Adiguzel

Title: Phase Changes and Structural Reactions Governing Shape Reversibility in Shape Memory Alloys

Invited talk

Prof. Osman Adiguzel

Firat University , Turkey

Abstract

Metallic alloys and composites have different crystal phases at different conditions and exhibit different characteristics. These phases are described as Temperature-Composition and Pressure-Composition dependent phase diagrams. Crystal structures and crystal phases of these alloys change with structural reactions depending on variation of temperature and pressure. 

Some materials take place in a class of advanced smart materials with the fundamental properties. Shape memory alloys take place in a class of adaptive structural materials called intelligent or smart materials by giving stimulus response to changes in the external conditions. 

These alloys exhibit dual characteristics, shape memory effect and superelasticity with the recoverability of two shapes at different conditions, and used as shape memory elements in many interdisciplinary fields, from biomedical to the building industry. Shape memory effect is initiated thermomechanical treatments on cooling and deformation and performed thermally on heating and cooling, with which shape of the material cycles between original and deformed shapes in reversible way. Therefore, this behavior can be called thermoelasticity. Deformation in low temperature condition is plastic deformation, with which strain energy is stored in the materials and released on heating by recovering the original shape. 

This phenomenon is governed by the thermomechanical and thermoresponsive structural reactions, thermal and stress induced martensitic transformations. Thermal induced martensitic transformations occur on cooling with cooperative movement of atoms in <110 > -type directions on a {110} - type plane of austenite matrix, which is basal plane of martensite, along with lattice twinning, and ordered parent phase structures turn into the twinned martensite structures. Movements of atoms in this reaction are driven by lattice invariant shear. The twinned structures turn into detwinned martensite structures by means of stress induced martensitic transformations with deformation. Reverse austenitic transformation occurs on heating and the detwinned martensite structures turn into the ordered parent phase structure on heating.

Superelasticity is performed with mechanically stressing and releasing the material in the parent austenite phase region, and shape recovery occurs instantly upon releasing by exhibiting elastic material behavior. Superelasticity is also result of stress induced martensitic transformation and ordered parent phase structures turn into the detwinned martensite structures with stressing. 

Superelasticity is performed in nonlinear way, the stressing and releasing paths are different at stress-strain diagram and hysteresis loop refers to the energy dissipation.  

Copper based alloys exhibit this property in metastable β-phase region. Lattice invariant shear and twinning is not uniform in these alloys and gives rise to the formation of complex layered structures. These structures can be described by different unit cells as 3R, 9R or 18R depending on the stacking sequences.

In the present contribution, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were carried out on copper based CuZnAl and CuAlMn alloys. X-ray diffraction profiles and electron diffraction patterns reveal that both alloys exhibit super lattice reflections inherited from parent phase due to the displacive character of martensitic transformation

Biography

Dr. Adiguzel graduated from Department of Physics, Ankara University, Turkey in 1974 and received PhD- degree from Dicle University, Diyarbakir-Turkey. He has studied at Surrey University, Guildford, UK, as a post- doctoral research scientist in 1986-1987, and studied were focused on shape memory effect in shape memory alloys. His academic life started following graduation by attending an assistant to Dicle University in January 1975. He became professor in 1996 at Firat University in Turkey, and retired on November 28, 2019, due to the age limit of 67, following academic life of 45 years. He supervised 5 PhD- theses and 3 M. Sc- theses and published over 80 papers in international and national journals; He joined over 120 conferences and symposia in international level with contribution. He served the program chair or conference chair/co-chair in some of these activities. Also, he joined in last six years (2014 - 2019) over 60 conferences as Keynote Speaker and Conference Co-Chair organized by different companies. Additionally, he joined over 70 online conferences in the same way in pandemic period of 2020-2021. Dr. Adiguzel served his directorate of Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Firat University, in 1999-2004. He received a certificate awarded to him and his experimental group in recognition of significant contribution of 2 patterns to the Powder Diffraction File – Release 2000. The ICDD (International Centre for Diffraction Data) also appreciates cooperation of his group and interest in Powder Diffraction File.

Mr. Kpare Jude Yinenti

Title: Fabrication and Characterisation of the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Recycled Polyethylene-Graphene Oxide Composites

Invited talk

Mr. Kpare Jude Yinenti

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana

Abstract

Over the past few decades, plastic waste management has been a major issue worldwide. Several measures have been adopted such as landfilling, incineration, bio-digestion and many more. However, all these methods do not suffice to adequately solve the problem while harnessing the potentials of the plastic material. Hence innovative recycling is the best alternative. In this project polyethylene waste was recycled and coupled with graphene oxide (GO) to form a composite by injection moulding method. The GO was synthesized from graphite using the Improved Hummer’s method and characterised by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. Recycled Polyethylene (RPE) with a melt flow index (MFI) of 0.1 g/min and a density of 0.917 g/cm3 was used. The spectra obtained from the FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy confirmed successful synthesis of the GO. The mechanical and thermal properties of the formulated RPE-GO composites were investigated. The tensile and impact strengths were increased by 22.26% and 63%, respectively with increasing GO contents from 0 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% at 0.5 wt.% increments. The increase in the mechanical properties of the RPE was attributed to the high load bearing capacity of the GO. The thermal properties of the RPE-GO composites indicated that GO addition had significant effect on the thermal conductivity of the composites with a 9% increment owing to the low intrinsic conductivity of GO. The specific heat capacity increased by 27.68% whilst the thermal diffusivity decreased. This demonstrated that the RPE-GO composites have a better thermal storage capacity than RPE due to the addition of GO. The formulated composites can be applied in certain structural applications like airplane ailerons and heat sink applications. Also, the composites can be used for more conductive applications when the GO is reduced to rGO.

Biography

Jude is a self-driven and highly motivated young researcher at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, with demonstrated expertise and interests in polymer composites, 2D materials and electronic materials fabrication. He also studied at the Ulsan National Institute of Science Technology, South Korea in Advanced Materials Science where he researched on Functionalized Nanomaterials for Gas Sensors and Polymer Nanocomposites for high temperature applications. He is a budding scientist with a strong interest in advancing sustainable solutions in materials and an advocate for STEM education and innovation in Ghana and Africa as a whole.

Prof. Ashish Kumar Thakur

Title: Damage analysis of piezoelectric rectangular plane material structures

Invited talk

Prof. Ashish Kumar Thakur

Mekelle University, Ethiopia

Abstract

This research study presents a simple analytical model for a permeable and semi-permeable piezoelectric rectangular plane mostly weakened by screw dislocation multiple cracks, under in-plane electric displacement and anti-plane shear stress. The purpose of this paper is to indentify damage ratio of energy store during multi-cracks evolved. The continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory is used to define the damage variable and evolution law of the micro-voids growth in the crystals. The torsional solution of arbitrarily cracks in an isotropic rectangular cross-section was considered and. numerical result is provided to illustrate the simple dislocation method in handling crack configurations. The boundary of the anti-plane stress induced by strain field plastic zone is found using the stress field in the vicinity of crack tips and the Von Mises yield criterion The numerical solution of the integral equations is presented to calculate stress intensity factors (SIFs) and torsional stiffness. 

Biography

Ashish Thakur has completed his PhD in mechanical metallurgical area from the Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay. He has been working as a Associate Professor of School of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Mekelle University (MU) in Tigray State of Ethiopia since 2015.

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